Dublin, Ireland

Set List - June 13, 2008

Per jorcx on The Leonard Cohen Forum

First Set

Dance Me To The End Of Love
The Future
Ain't No Cure For Love
Bird On The Wire
Everybody Knows
In My Secret Life
Who By Fire
Anthem

Second Set

Tower Of Song
Suzanne
Gypsy Wife
Boogie Street
Hallelujah
Democracy
I'm Your Man
A Thousand Kisses Deep (recited)
Take This Waltz

First Encore

Waiting For The Miracle
First We Take Manhattan

Second Encore

That Don't Make It Junk
If It Be Your Will
Closing Time

Final Encore

I Tried to Leave You
Whither Thou Goest











Dublin, Ireland

Set List - June 14, 2008

Per Manslady on The Leonard Cohen Forum

First Set

Dance Me To The End Of Love
The Future
Ain't No Cure For Love
Bird On The Wire
Everybody Knows
In My Secret Life
Who By Fire
Anthem

Second Set

Tower Of Song
Suzanne
Gypsy Wife
Boogie Street
Hallelujah
Democracy
I'm Your Man
A Thousand Kisses Deep (recited)
Take This Waltz

First Encore

Waiting For The Miracle
First We Take Manhattan

Second Encore

That Don't Make It Junk
If It Be Your Will
Closing Time

Final Encore

I Tried to Leave You











Dublin, Ireland

Set List - June 15, 2008

Per mreeyore on The Leonard Cohen Forum

First Set

Dance Me To The End Of Love
The Future
Ain't No Cure For Love
Bird On The Wire
Everybody Knows
In My Secret Life
Heart With No Companion
Who By Fire
Anthem

Second Set

Tower Of Song
Suzanne
Gypsy Wife
Boogie Street
Hallelujah
Democracy
I'm Your Man
A Thousand Kisses Deep (recited)
Take This Waltz

First Encore

So Long, Marianne
First We Take Manhattan

Second Encore

That Don't Make It Junk
If It Be Your Will
Closing Time

Final Encore

I Tried to Leave You
Whither Thou Goest











Dublin, Ireland

Cohen shows why he's still main man

Independent.ie - June 14, 2008 by Brendan Farrelly

WITHIN seconds of walking on stage last night, poet-songwriter Leonard Cohen was Dublin's man.

The Canadian folk rock singer, pictured left with his band, epitomised style and showmanship with a performance that electrified a packed house at the Royal Hospital Kilmainham.

And then there was the voice.

Looking relaxed and in control, his deep gravelly tone had lost nothing of its power to capture and then almost hypnotise.

He appeared promptly at 8pm, followed by three female backing singers, including his long-term collaborator Sharon Robinson, and a full six-piece band.

The crowd, including Gerry Adams, and many of them the wrong side of 50, were quick to respond to his easy manner.

Soon, old masterpieces, including 'There ain't no room for love', 'Bird on the wire' and 'In my secret life', were echoing across the air.

Other favourites were 'The Future' and 'Everybody knows' and, once again, Cohen proved his enduring appeal.











Dublin, Ireland

A genteel affair in 'city of poets and singers'

The Irish Times - June 14, 2008 by Kevin Courtney

REVIEW: Kevin Courtney doffs his cap to Leonard Cohen who played the first of three nights in the Royal Hospital Kilmainham, last night.

It was a most genteel affair, hosted by a perfect gentleman - the kind who doffs his fedora when greeting a lady, tilts his head slightly when applauded, and who is conscientious in his gratitude.

"It's a great honour to play for you, ladies and gentlemen," he tells his 10,000 guests assembled in the spacious grounds of the Royal Hospital Kilmainham. No, sir, it's a great honour for us to hear you perform. If we had brought our hats, we'd be doffing them to the gaunt, besuited gentleman who's songs have soundtracked the understated moments of our lives.

The first of Leonard Cohen's three-night run of Dublin concerts was like an evening out at the proms - champagne at the bar, falafels at the food counter, and the smell of cigar smoke wafting over the cool evening air.

There seems to be only one teenager in the whole venue - and he's busking Cohen songs for the entertainment of the food queue. Most of the people in the audience are old enough to remember hearing Suzanne wafting over the airwaves for the first time, and hearing songs such as Bird On a Wire and Who By Fire will remind them of their own carefree youth, when they happily sung along to Cohen's mournful, regret-tinged lyrics, secure in the knowledge that they applied somebody else's lonely life.

The writer of those lyrics is now 74; he's a loser in love, breaking up with actress Rebecca De Mornay in the 1990s, and a loser in luck, having been brought to near ruin by an associate who siphoned off his money while Cohen was cloistered away in a Zen Buddhist monastery.

His financial straits may have driven the reclusive pop star back out on the road, but Cohen's loss is our gain - as we bask in the warmth of Cohen's rubbed-tobacco voice and feel an unbidden twinge of self-recognition in his stark word-pictures and candid couplets. He recites the lines of A Thousand Kisses Deep , then tells us what a privilege it is to read poetry "in this city of poets and singers".

Cohen's backing band, led by bassist Roscoe Beck, form a velvety sound cushion around Cohen's deeply intoned singing. Drummer Raphael Gayol, guitarist Bob Metzger and keyboard player Neil Larsen are finely tuned to Cohen's every nuance, and the backing singers - Cohen's co-writer Sharon Robinson and the Webb sisters, Charlie and Hattie - sigh and whisper their way around the melodies, tip-toeing gracefully around Cohen's flat, commanding baritone.

The bandurria, laud, archilaud and 12-string guitar playing of Javier Mas adds colour and texture to Take This Waltz (a song inspired by the poet Federico Garcia Lorca, Cohen informs us), while the wind instruments of Dino Soldo add a little bite to the crushed velvet smoothness. The sound system is beautifully balanced, allowing us to fully savour such familiar fare as Ain't No Cure for Love, I'm Your Man , Everybody Knows and Tower of Song.

Cohen remains restrained throughout, letting his inner strength take the musical weight, and it makes for a consummate night of nostalgia. When he pushes his voice that extra yard for Hallelujah , his 10,000 guests rise as one in a standing ovation. Well, when you're in the presence of someone of such class and vintage, it's only good manners.











Dublin, Ireland

An epic display from smiling dada of despair

Independent.ie - June 15, 2008 by Barry Egan

When legend Cohen takes to the stage, it's no less than a cultural event of Biblical dimensions, believes Barry Egan

Words on a page," Van Morrison once sang, "please don't call me a sage." You could happily call Leonard Cohen a sage without any fear of contradiction or even rebuke. Watching the Montreal mensch on stage at the Royal Kilmainham Hospital on Friday night, you could also add wise man, Zen-prophet, soothsayer, visionary, seer, bard, guru, godhead, high priest, soul-counsellor, troubadour, non-manic street preacher, chronicler of pain, Rinzai Zen Buddhist monk and holy man to that list.

Bono called him "Our Byron, our Shelley." I met the U2 singer and Guggi in Lillies on Friday night. They both went to Leonard's show -- as did Bono's wife Ali and Gerry Ryan and his kids.

The level of cultural excitement at Cohen's three sold-out shows in Dublin (the charismatic Canadian plays his final show tonight) bordered on mass hysteria. It wasn't so much a series of concerts by an old man in a grey suit as an event of biblical dimensions. He wasn't just here to sing us songs. He came down from the mountaintop with the stone tablets after talking to the angels. As he sang with that otherworldly gravel voice of his on The Future: "I'm the little Jew who wrote the Bible." The likes of U2 manager Paul McGuinness and his wife Kathy Gilfinan, tycoon Dermot Desmond, politician Dermot Ahern and actor Alan Rickman were there to absorb the messianic wisdom of the little Jew.

He didn't disappoint them or the 10,000 people who came to see him on Friday night. Over the course of nearly three hours he played everything from I'm Your Man to First We'll Take Manhattan to Dance Me Til The End Of Love to The Future to Closing Time to Bird On A Wire.

Frail as a bird on wire himself, Leonard never stopped smiling (so much for his title as 'The Dada of Despair'); his smiley cheekiness most apparent on The Tower Of Song when he sang the lines:

"Well my friends are gone and my hair is grey
I ache in the places where I used to play."

His masterpiece Hallelujah was majestic in the chill of a late summer's evening in Dublin. If It Be Your Will? was unforgettable (as unforgettable as the fabulously androgynous Antony Hegarty's showstealing version at the Leonard Cohen tribute night at the Point in 2006).

On his melancholic masterpiece Suzanne, he sang with vulnerability of pain and love -- all peeling from his stretched larynx like a snake shedding its skin -- as he moved softly about the stage underneath his trilby hat:

"While Suzanne holds the mirror
And you want to travel with her
And you want to travel blind
And you know that you can trust her
For she's touched your perfect body with her mind," he sang, as trumpets of angels swooped around him.

Watching Leonard onstage at Royal Kilmainham Hospital on Friday night -- as opposed to Bono holding court in Lillies on Friday night perhaps -- you could be forgiven for thinking that here was a man possibly endowed with profound moral and spiritual insight and intuitive powers, and possibly even special powers of divination.

There was a time when every ponytailed advertising guru of a certain age would recite Cohen's risque masterpiece Chelsea Hotel at Rathmines house parties ad nauseam. Languid Leonard didn't play that song but he didn't miss out much else on Friday night.

"I always thought of myself as a competent, minor poet. I know who I'm up against," the high priest of pathos once said with his charmingly crooked smile.

Asked what he was up against, exactly, Cohen smiled and replied: "Dante, and Shakespeare, Isaiah, King David, Homer, you know. So I've always thought that I, you know, do my job okay."

You do more than okay, Leonard.











Dublin, Ireland

Cohen's master class will become Irish concert lore

Independent.ie - June 16, 2008 by John Meagher

Leonard Cohen Royal Hospital, Kilmainham

IN an age where international performers have been known to make three separate appearances in Ireland practically every year, the arrival of the tour-shy Leonard Cohen is big news.

The 73-year-old Canadian hasn't played Ireland for over 20 years and with his noted aversion to the road, there's a good chance we won't be seeing him again. With that in mind, there's a great deal of love in the house tonight. And Cohen responds in kind.

What unfolds over two-and-a-half hours is likely to become the stuff of Irish concert lore. Quite simply, it doesn't get much better than this.

Dapper in a grey, pinstripe double breasted suit with matching trilby, he looks every bit the elder statesman of music. But there's nothing pompous or po-faced about his performance -- his asides to the audience and his superb band are as droll as many of his lyrics.

The 23-song set list takes in all facets of his career with 'The Future', 'Everybody Knows' and 'In My Secret Life' leaving an indelible mark.

'Tower of Song' proves especially engaging, provoking mirth when he sings of aching "in the places where I used to play" and cheers with the line "I was blessed with a golden voice".

There's reverential silence for 'Suzanne' -- a song that he debuted 41 years ago, and which still retains its understated majesty.

Clearly, he's as delighted to be playing Dublin -- as is the audience.

After a spine-tingling spoken word version of 'A Thousand Kisses Deep' he's fulsome in his gratitude.

"It's a great privilege to say a poem to you in this city of poets and singers."

Midway through, he reclaims 'Hallelujah' from the mass of singer-songwriters who used the song to launch careers of varying quality. One of them, Damien Rice, supports him tonight.

His grace and humility are palpable, not just in his appreciation of the applause but with his colleagues on stage. And he's more than happy to share the spotlight, standing back to let backing singers, sisters Charlie and Hattie Webb, deliver a tender and beautiful 'If It Be Your Will'.

He's also ably abetted by long term collaborator Sharon Robinson, and the pair's voices mesh together wonderfully on set closer 'That Don't Make It Junk'.

There are cheers and tears at the end -- a special concert, one for the memory bank.











Dublin, Ireland

Comment

Independent.ie - June 20, 2008 by John Meagher

I'm writing this four days after seeing Leonard Cohen in concert and I've been thinking about his performance frequently since then. Quite simply, his show at the Royal Hospital, Kilmainham, is the best concert I have ever seen -- and I've been to quite a few gigs, averaging around 100 every year for the past seven or so years.

Just weeks ago, Bruce Springsteen turned in a typically brilliant display at the RDS and Radiohead didn't disappoint at Malahide Castle, but neither concert was in the same league as Cohen's.

The gig mattered so much because for most attendees, it was their first time to see such an iconic figure -- the Canadian hadn't played Ireland in 20 years. It also mattered because there's a very strong chance that we'll never see the tour-shy 73-year-old again. The two-and-a-half hours felt like a beautiful farewell.

But its magnificence was sealed by the collision of Cohen's gorgeous deep vocals, his gifted musicians and his grace and humility -- the latter commodities are in pitifully short supply in this business.

During his spoken word rendition of comparatively recent song, A Thousand Kisses Deep, I can't have been the only one to feel that I was witnessing art of the highest possible form -- a handful of minutes by which I can measure all future performances.

Since his three gigs at the weekend -- and from what I've heard, Saturday and Sunday matched Friday all the way -- attendees have posted messages on the independent.ie website sharing their memories of such a remarkable occasion.

"What I witnessed was soul inspiring on every level," wrote one respondent. "I have never been so moved by a performance," posted another. "Everything about the night was magical," proclaimed a third. Thank you, Leonard Cohen, for memories that will never be forgotten...











Dublin, Ireland

ENGLISH VERSION.

Fünfzehn Jahre für ein Halleluja

Der Tagesspiegell - June 15, 2008 by Von Rüdiger Schaper

Späte Zugabe: Leonard Cohen kehrt im Triumph auf die Konzertbühne zurück - in Dublin, der Stadt der Dichter

Der Poet. Der Prophet. Der Entertainer. Der vornehme Herr, der sich nach drei Stunden mit den Worten verabschiedet: „Drive home safely, friends. Don't catch a summer cold. And God bless you!"

Da ist nun jede Silbe wahr. Manch einer ist weit gereist, um diesen Mann bei seinem ersten Konzert auf europäischem Boden nach so unwahrscheinlich langer Zeit noch einmal zu erleben. Es ist empfindlich kühl in Dublin auf dem Freigelände beim Royal Hospital Kilmainham, und wenn es einen Gott gibt, und sei er irisch-katholisch und gegen die EU-Verfassung, dann müssen ihm - von einem alten Herrn zum anderen - an diesem Freitagabend die Ohren geklungen haben. Als Tausende aufspringen und Leonard Cohens „Hallelujah" mitsingen. Da werden sie eins: der Poet, der Prophet und der Entertainer.

Was für eine lange und gute Geschichte, Leonard Cohens Rückkehr. über fünfzehn Jahre war er nicht aufgetreten, hatte sich in ein kalifornisches ZenKloster zurückgezogen, und die zwei Alben, die der Eremit vom Mount Baldy Anfang des neuen Jahrtausends vorausschickte („Ten New Songs", „Dear Heather") klangen wie bitter brüchige Parodien seiner selbst. Man hatte ihn abgeschrieben, in den verdienten Ruhestand. Einmal musste es vorbei sein mit der Liebesnot, dem Gottesschmerz, der Weltverfluchung dieses Mannes, der von Frauen sang wie ein vor Lust zerrissener Jüngling mit grauem Haar und leicht gebücktem Gang.

Das Versprechen der ewigen Adoleszenz, das der Rock 'n' Roll ausstreut, hatte ihn über die Jahrzehnte arg mitgenommen. „Songs of Leonard Cohen", seine erste Platte, die mit „Suzanne", datiert von 1968. Stets auf der Suche nach dem vollkommenen Sound für seine Verse, war die Popmusik Cohens gröβte und zuweilen unglücklichste Liaison. Und vor ein paar Jahren gab es diese in der Popbranche nicht seltenen Berichte, dass eine ehemalige Managerin mit mehreren Millionen Dollar von Cohens Konten untergetaucht sei.

Auch das gehört zu der langen Geschichte, deren gutes Ende mit Cohens ersten Konzerten im Mai in seiner kanadischen Heimat seinen Anfang genommen hat. Das Internet spielt ja auch ein bisschen Gott, indem es vieles gibt und vieles nimmt: die überraschung zum Beispiel. Cohen-Blogs und Youtube-Kostproben lieβen auf ein Wunder hoffen. Da war der lange Verschollene nicht wiederzuerkennen, oder plötzlich ganz bei sich. „Waiting for the Miracle". Den Song bringt er als Zugabe, da haben die Dubliners das Wunder schon selbst erfahren. Leonard Cohen ist so gut wie nie. Und er spielt an die drei Stunden. Die Stimme ist fest, modulationsreicher, er singt mit geschlossenen Augen und leicht durchgedrückten Knien. Er singt. Er murmelt nicht, er singt mit zarter Weisheit „Dance Me to the End of Love", „Bird on the Wire", „Who by Fire". Die Band trägt den Poeten von Hymne zu Hymne. Er ist so beglückt von der Begleitung, dass er nach jedem kleinen Solo die Musiker aufs Neue vorstellt. Das geschieht an diesem Abend, der aus der Erinnerung für die Erinnerung geschaffen ist, ein Dutzend Mal.

So beschwingt ist der Herr im dunklen Anzug und mit Hut, den er jedes Mal abnimmt, wenn er sich vor seinen Instrumentalisten verbeugt: vor Javier Mas, dem spanischen Meister der akustischen Saiten, vor Dino Soldo, dem Saxofonisten, dem E-Gitarristen Bob Metzger, dem Schlagzeuger Rafael Gayol, dem Pianisten Neil Larsen und Roscoe Beck, dem Bassisten und Bandleader. Wie viele wunderschöne, flüsterweiche Backgroundsängerinnen hat er schon neben sich gehabt, keine waren wie diese: Sharon Robinson, die Produzentin der letzten beiden Alben, und Charley und Hattie, die Webb Sisters aus England, sie singen wie zwei von Luzifer ausgeliehene Engel. „Doo-dam-dam", so tönen sie minutenlang, und Cohen fleht sie an, nicht aufzuhören, dabei lächelt er verzückt und leise libidinös und sagt, dies sei der „Schlüssel zu den Geheimnissen des Lebens". Doo-dam-dam. Endlich Entertainer!

Im März wurde Leonard Cohen in die Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame aufgenommen, Lou Reed hielt in New York die Laudatio. War er doch immer mehr ein Bänkelsänger, der so viele Pop- und Rockmusiker beeinflusste, so hat er jetzt mit bald 74 Jahren doch noch den letzten Schritt gemacht. Auch wenn er eher wie ein Rockmusiker auftritt, er ist nicht Nick Cave oder Tom Waits (die ihm auch einiges zu verdanken haben). Aber er rockt doch! Cohen rockt! Er geht aus sich heraus! Bei Leonard Cohen braute sich schon immer eine spezielle Mischung zusammen, Sex and God and Rock 'n' Roll.

Man kann es gar nicht oft genug sagen. Cohens Töne waren noch nie so musikalisch. Sogar die neueren Brummelverse entfalten Musikalität. Bei „Take this Waltz", jenem Song, den er dem spanischen Dichter Federico García Lorca widmet, tanzt das Auditorium im Dreivierteltakt zwischen den Reihen, die humorlos-strengen Ordner verlieren zum ersten Mal den überblick. Dreimal sagt Cohen, wie glücklich er sich schätze, in Dublin, der Stadt der Dichter, auftreten zu dürfen. Er rezitiert sein „A Thousand Kisses Deep", so tief, sonor und erschütternd bis ins Mark, dass Oscar Wildes „De profundis" anklingt - und all die anderen irischen Weltpoeten; Joyce, Yeats. Auch an Shaw kann man denken, wenn man am anderen Morgen auf dem Dubliner Flughafen ein Zitat aus „Pygmalion" am Gate entdeckt, in groβen Lettern : „Der Unterschied zwischen einer Dame und einem Blumenmädchen ist nicht, wie sie sich benimmt, sondern, wie sie behandelt wird."

Cohen begegnet seinen Fans mit einer Höflichkeit, die an Ironie grenzt. Das schlieβt den Poeten, den Propheten mit ein. So kann man die Geschichte auch erzählen wie einen biblischen Mythos. Als wäre er ein Seher des Alten Testaments - Cohens Judentum war von jeher katholisch gefärbt, ehe er sich buddhistisch orientierte -, kommt er aus der Versenkung wieder, aus der Wüste und der Selbstverlorenheit, und seine Worte entfalten mehr Gewalt als je zuvor.

„Democracy is coming to the USA", skandiert er im Marschrhythmus, das Lied ist bald zwanzig Jahre alt. Damals schon sang er vom „spirituellen Durst" der Amerikaner, und dass von dort das Beste und das Schlimmste kommt. Dem religiösen 21. Jahrhundert, in dem wir uns unbehaglich einrichten, hat Cohen von jeher die Leviten gelesen; nur empfand man es früher als Spleen, wenn er mit dem Glauben rang. „And Jesus was a sailor/when he walked upon the water (...) All men will be sailors then /until the sea shall free them", heiβt es in „Suzanne". Für sie hängt er noch einmal die Gitarre um. Er schafft es, diese ins Mythisch-Mystische gewachsene Susanna im Bade still konzentriert zu besingen, ohne mit ihr den groβen alten Kitsch auszuschütten, der sich um diesen Song gelegt hat wie Seetang um ein gesunkenes Schiff.

Es verspricht nichts Gutes, wenn Cohen vom Kommenden kündet, „The Future"; auch dies ein Lied der Zeitenwende nach dem Massaker auf dem Platz des Himmlischen Friedens und dem Fall der Mauer. Wenn er den Horror des 20. Jahrhunderts zurückfordert, denn: „I've seen the future, Baby, it is murder." Von so einem Grabredner kann man nur träumen, mit diesem lustigen Hut und diesem Lächeln, das die Seele berührt und von Song zu Song immer weiter in die Ferne rückt. Weil es zu schön ist, muss jetzt das Ende kommen, die swingende Abschiedsnummer, „Closing Time". So könnte es bis zum Morgengrauen aufhören.

„First we take Manhattan, then we take Berlin." Das Dublin-Konzert ist eine Sensation, dieses Lied wird zum Triumph. Auch wenn es geschwindelt ist. Leonard Cohen tourt weiter durch Europa, doch der Auftritt in der Waldbühne wurde gestrichen. Bisher ersatzlos.


Translated by Google Translate

Fifteen years for an Alleluia

Der Tagesspiegell - June 15, 2008 by Von Rüdiger Schaper

Late adding: Leonard Cohen returns in triumph to the concert stage - in Dublin, the city of poets

The poet. The prophet. The entertainer. The noble Lord, who after three hours with the words adopted: "Drive home safely, friends. Do not catch a summer cold. And God bless you! "

There is now every syllable true. Some traveled far to this man during his first concert on European soil after such a long time unlikely to experience again. It is sensitive cool in Dublin on the open ground at the Royal Hospital Kilmainham, and if there is one God, and he was Irish-Catholic and against the EU constitution, you need him - from an old gentleman on the other - on this Friday evening the ears geklungen. As thousands jump up and Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" sing along. Since they are one: the poet, the prophet and the entertainer.

What a long and good story, Leonard Cohen's return. About fifteen years, it had not occurred, he had placed himself in a Californian ZenKloster withdrawn, and the two albums, the hermit from Mount Baldy beginning of the new millennium vorausschickte ( "Ten New Songs," "Dear Heather") sounded bitter as his brittle parodies They had themselves him off in the earned retirement. Once it had to be over with the Liebesnot, the pain of God, Weltverfluchung this man, the women sang as a youth before pleasure zerrissener with grey hair and slightly gebücktem course.

The promise of eternal adolescence, the Rock 'n' Roll ausstreut, had him over the decades arg too. "Songs of Leonard Cohen", his first album, with "Suzanne", dated from 1968. Always in search of the perfect sound for his verses, Cohen was the biggest pop music and sometimes unglücklichste Liaison. And a few years ago, there were those in the Popbranche not rare reports that a former manager with several million dollars from Cohen's accounts submerged.

Is also part of the long history whose happy ending with Cohen's first concerts in May in its Canadian home its start has been made. The Internet is also a bit of God, by much, and much is the surprise, for example. Cohen blogs and Youtube-tasting could hope for a miracle. There was the long Verschollene not recognize, or at very suddenly. "Waiting for the Miracle." The song he brings as premium, as the Dubliners have the miracle in itself. Leonard Cohen is as good as ever. And he plays to three hours. The voice is strong, modulationsreicher, he sings with eyes closed and easily durchgedrückten knees. He sings. He mutters, he sings with gentle wisdom "Dance Me to the End of Love," "Bird on the Wire", "Who by Fire". The band wears the poets of anthem to anthem. He is accompanied by the beglückt that he had after every small solo musicians presented anew. This happens on this evening, from memory for the alarm has been set up, a dozen times

So beschwingt is the Lord in the dark suit and with a hat, which he declines each time when he is in front of his instrumentalists verbeugt: before Javier Mas, the Spanish master of acoustic strings, before Dino Soldo, the saxophonist, an e-guitarist Bob Metzger , Drummer Rafael Gayol, the pianist Neil Larsen and Roscoe Beck, the bassist and band leader. How many beautiful flüsterweiche Background singers, he already had next to no were like this: Sharon Robinson, the producer of the last two albums, and Charley and Hattie, the Webb Sisters from England, they sing like two of Lucifer borrowed angel. "Doo-dam-dam", it sounds so minutes, Cohen and implores them to not stop, but he smiles and quietly ecstatic libidinös and says that this is the "key to the secrets of life". Doo-dam-dam. Finally entertainer!

In March, Leonard Cohen into the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame, Lou Reed in New York gave the eulogy. Was he always more Bänkelsänger, so many pop and rock musicians influenced, he soon now with 74 years still the last step. Even though he is more like a rock musician occurs, it is not Nick Cave or Tom Waits (which he also owes a lot to have). But he rocks it! Cohen rocks! He is, in itself! When Leonard Cohen brewed always a special blend together, Sex and God and rock 'n' Roll.

It can not be said often enough. Cohen notes have never been so musical. Even the newer Brummelverse unfold musicality. In "Take this Waltz", that song, which he the Spanish poet Federico García Lorca dedicated to dance the auditorium in the three-quarter time between the rows, the strict folder humorlos-lose for the first time the overview. Three Cohen says how happy he is appreciated, in Dublin, the city of poets, to occur. He recites his "A Thousand Kisses Deep", so deep and sonor shocking to the core that Oscar Wilde's "De profundis" anklingt - and all the other Irish poets world; Joyce, Yeats. Even Shaw can one think when you next morning at the Dublin airport a quotation from "Pygmalion" at the gate discovered in large letters: "The difference between a lady and a flower girl is not how it behaves, but how they treated. "

Cohen met his fans with a courtesy, which borders on irony. This includes the poet, with the Prophet. You can also tell the story of how a biblical myth. As if he is a seer of the Old Testament - Cohen's Judaism has always been Catholic dyed before he Buddhist-oriented - he verses from the sinking again, from the desert and the Selbstverlorenheit, and his words unfold more violence than ever before.

"Democracy is coming to the U.S.," he skandiert in march rhythm, the song is almost twenty years old. At that time already, he sang "spiritual thirst" of the Americans, and that then the best and the worst. The religious 21st Century in which we set up uneasily, Cohen has always been the Levites read only felt it earlier than Spleen, when he rang with the faith. "And Jesus was a sailor / when he walked upon the water (...) All men will be sailors then / until the sea shall free them" as stated in "Suzanne". For them he is once again the guitar. He manages them in the Mystic Mythisch-grown Susanna in bathing still concentrated besingen without her the grand old kitsch be distributed, this song is like seaweed has a sunken ship.

It promises nothing good, if Cohen, later announcing, "The Future", also a song of the time turn after the massacre at Tiananmen Square and the fall of the Berlin Wall. If he is the horror of the 20th Zurückfordert century, because: "I've seen the future, baby, it is murder." From such a grave speakers can only dream about, with this funny hat and this smile that touches the soul and song to song ever further into the Distance moves. Because it is too good, must now end, the swinging farewell number, "Closing Time". So it might be until the morning stop.

"First we take Manhattan, then we take Berlin." The Dublin concert is a sensation, this song is a triumph. Even if it geschwindelt. Leonard Cohen is touring through Europe, but the appearance in the forest scene was deleted. So far replacement.











Dublin, Ireland

ENGLISH VERSION.

Der alte Meister der letzten Lieder: Leonard Cohen

Die Presse - June 15, 2008 by Thomas Kramar

Nach 15 Jahren Pause tritt der groβe Singer/Songwriter wieder auf. Seine Europatournee begann er mit drei Abenden in Dublin: Songs von „Suzanne" bis „Closing Time", Perfektion und Rührung.

Als ich das letzte Mal auf die Bühnen trat", sagt der alte Sänger, den Hut in der Hand, „da war ich 60: a kid with crazy dreams." Heute ist Leonard Cohen 73 Jahre alt, kein kid mehr, ein gutes Stück weiter in seiner lebenslangen Prozession vom weisen Lebemann zum lebenden Weisen. Und er ist wieder auf Tournee, vielleicht auf seiner letzten, aber ist Cohen nicht jede Tour angegangen, als könnte es seine letzte sein?

Jedes Lied, als könnte es sein letztes sein? I shall speak no more / then my voice be still / as it was before, so hat er das Nachher einst, 1984, formuliert. Dann schweigt der Sänger, der Chor übernimmt: Das war nun eine der vielen Zugaben, der vielen letzten Lieder Leonard Cohens in Dublin.

Denn die ersten drei Konzerte seiner Europatour sang er in der irischen Hauptstadt, wo sich, so Cohen, „in jedem Schlafzimmer ein Genie" findet, und zwar auf den „Grounds of Royal Hospital Kilmainham", einem Ort des gepflegten Grün, vor insgesamt 40.000 Zusehern. Von denen ganz offensichtlich ein Gutteil seine Lieder im Herzen und auf der Zunge trägt: Diese Dubliner hätten Cohen gefeiert, und wenn er als drunk in a midnight choir gekommen wäre, ohne Proben, frei und achtlos.

Himmlische Barmusik

Aber er kam gar nicht achtlos, sondern höchst sorgfältig, mit einer genauso sorgfältigen Band, vor der Cohen immer wieder völlig zu Recht in einer schönen Geste tief den Hut zog: Sie spielte das, was sich Gläubige wohl erwarten dürfen, wenn sie in in einer Bar namens Himmel angekommen sind: himmlische Barmusik, in der sogar die Mandoline, sonst ein Instrument der Anbiederung, gesegnet klingt. Und vor allem höchst bewusst eingesetzt.

Ganz anders als ein anderer groβer Alter des Songs, als der unentwegt durch die Länder streunende, seine eigenen Stücke ständig neu erfindende Bob Dylan, überlässt Cohen nichts dem Zufall: Die Rührung, die er unweigerlich mit sich bringt, ist auch gut arrangiert. Das spricht nicht gegen die Rührung und nicht gegen ihn. Er weiβ, was er ist und was er kann: I was born like this, I had no choice, I was born with the gift of a golden voice, für diese Zeilen in „Tower Of Song" bedankte ihn herzlicher Jubel.

Wohl auch dafür, dass er wieder in den Turm des Songs zurückgekehrt ist. Was hat er inzwischen getan? Viele Antidepressiva genommen, resümierte Cohen auf der Bühne, „sich mit vielen Religionen und Philosophien eingelassen" (tatsächlich hat er, im jüdischen Glauben aufgewachsen und immer wieder zu diesem zurückgekehrt, u.a. Jahre in einem buddhistischen Kloster verbracht), aber dann habe die Wahrhaftigkeit gewonnen: Truthfulness came through.

Am Schluss von „Tower Of Song" (in dem seine golden voice ja auch von 27 angels from the great beyond begleitet wird) stand er da, gesenkten Hauptes, den Hut in der Hand, und hörte den Chorsängerinnen zu, lächelte schlieβlich: „Ich habe den Schlüssel zu den Mysterien aller Dinge gesucht, und hier ist er: Doo dum dum..."

Das Licht auf der „Boogie Street"

Das mag an einen ergrauten Graffiti-Spruch erinnern, ist aber gar nicht so unernst gemeint. In Cohens Welt liegt das Spirituelle mitten im scheinbar Trivialen, der Sinn in der Sinnlichkeit, die Crown of Light findet sich auf der Boogie Street. Sein „Hallelujah" sei kalt und gebrochen, heiβt es im gleichnamigen Lied, das er in Dublin vor Inbrunst zitternd sang: Doch durch die Brüche kommt das Licht, kommentiert er das selbst in „Anthem": Ring your bells that still can ring, forget your perfect offering!

Wen immer er hier anspricht, die ersten (und letzten) Ansprechpartner in Cohens Songs sind immer die Geliebten, die gegenwärtigen, die verflossenen und auch die soeben verflieβenden: Mit „Dance Me To The End Of Love", zwischen nackter Verzweiflung und verzweifelter Einsicht, arrangiert für die erwähnte himmlische Bar (inklusive Flötensolo, bei Cohen geht sogar das durch) begann das Konzert; im dritten Song hieβ es milder: „There Ain't No Cure For Love"; und dann schon folgte der erste reine Bekenntnissong: „Bird On A Wire", von Cohen mit 34 geschrieben, wohl weil er nicht warten wollte, bis er 68 wurde. Um Verzeihung bat er heute wie damals, und sogar die wunderbare Begründung fürs Lügen (I thought that a lover has to be some kind of liar, too) wirkt nach wie vor. Und belegt, einmal ganz prosaisch gesehen, gut, dass zu einem wirklich guten Herzensbrecher ein wenig Selbstironie gehört wie die Prise Salz in den Kuchen. „I'm Your Man" funktioniert ähnlich.

Weitere Höhepunkte? Ein scharfes „Democracy (Is Coming To The USA)", innig verflochtene Stimmen bei „Who By Fire", das andächtig rezitierte „A Thousand Kisses Deep". Das wienerische „Take This Waltz". „Suzanne" sowieso. Die besonders ausdrücklich letzten Lieder, darunter natürlich ein wildes „Closing Time", dann im langen Zugabenblock. Schlieβlich der letzte Gruβ: „At the risk of offending an atheist: God bless you."

Welcher Atheist könnte dem widerstehen?


Translated by Google Translate

The old masters of the last songs: Leonard Cohen

Die Presse - June 15, 2008 by Thomas Kramar

After 15 years the big break occurs Singer / Songwriter again. His European tour he began with three nights in Dublin: Songs of "Suzanne" to "Closing Time", perfection and emotion.

When I last met on the stage, "says the old singer, hat in hand," since I was 60: a kid with crazy dreams. "Today, Leonard Cohen is 73 years old, no longer kid, a good piece continue in his life-long procession of living man to have ways of living. And he is back on tour, perhaps in his last, but Cohen is not dealt with each tour as it might be his last?

Every song, as it might be his last? I shall speak no more / then my voice be still / as it was before, he has the once after, 1984, formulated. Then the singer is silent, the choir will: That was one of many encores, the many recent Leonard Cohen's songs in Dublin.

For the first three concerts of his European tour he sang in the Irish capital, where, Cohen, "in every bedroom a genius" is, on the grounds of Royal Hospital Kilmainham, "a place of manicured green, a total of 40,000 Viewers. Of those obviously a good his songs in the hearts and bears on the tongue: This Dublin Cohen had celebrated, and if he was drunk in a midnight choir would have without samples, free and careless.

Heavenly Barmusik

But he was not careless, but very carefully, with an equally careful band, before Cohen always quite right in a beautiful gesture deeply moved the hat: You played what is probably the faithful to expect when they are in a Bar called heaven arrived: heavenly Barmusik, in which even the mandolin, an instrument of otherwise Anbiederung blessed sounds. And above all highly aware.

Quite unlike another great age of the songs, as the incessantly by the countries stray, his own pieces constantly erfindende Bob Dylan, Cohen leaves nothing to chance: The emotion, which he inevitably brings with it, is also well arranged. This is not against the emotion and not against him. He knows what he is and what he can: I was born like this, I had no choice, I was born with the gift of a golden voice for these lines in "Tower of Song" thanked him warm cheers.

Was most likely that he returned to the tower of song returned. What has he done now? Many antidepressants taken, Cohen summed up on the stage, "with many religions and philosophies embedded" (in fact, he grew up in the Jewish faith and repeatedly returned to this, including years in a Buddhist monastery spent), but then have won the truthfulness : Truthfulness came through.

At the end of "Tower of Song" (in which his golden voice also from 27 angels from the great beyond support), he stood there, head lowered, his hat in hand, and heard the choir singers, finally smiled: "I have the key to the mysteries of all things wanted, and here it is: Doo dum dum ..."

The light on the "Boogie Street"

That may be a gray graffiti remember saying, but is not so unernst meant. In Cohen's world is the spiritual heart of the seemingly Trivialen, the sense of sensuality, the Crown of Light can be found on the Boogie Street. His "Hallelujah" was cold and broken, says the same song, which he fervor in Dublin before shaking sang: But through the breaks, the light, he commented that even in "Anthem": ring your bells that still can ring, forget your perfect offering,

Wen he always responds, the first (and last) contact in Cohen's songs are always the beloved, the current, and the verflossenen just verflieβenden: "Dance Me To The End Of Love, naked between despair and desperate insight arranged for the aforementioned heavenly bar (including flute solo, Cohen goes by) began the concert in the third song, it was mild: "There Is not No Cure For Love", and then have followed the first pure commitment Song: "Bird On A Wire ", by Cohen with 34 written, probably not because he wanted to wait until he was 68. To he asked forgiveness today as then, and even the wonderful justification for the lies (I thought that a lover has to be some kind of liar, too) does remain. And proves once seen quite prosaic, well that a really good heart-breakers a little self-mockery, like the pinch of salt in the cake. "I'm Your Man" is similar.

Other highlights? A sharp "Democracy (Is Coming To The USA), dearly verflochtene votes to" Who By Fire ", the devout recited" A Thousand Kisses Deep ". The Viennese "Take This Waltz". "Suzanne" anyway. The most recent explicit songs, of course, including a wild "Closing Time", then adding in the long block. Finally, the last greeting: "At the risk of offending an atheist: God bless you."

What the atheist could resist?











Dublin, Ireland

Blogs, Fan Photos and Reports

Lovely concert photos by Steiner62.


Blog - BifSniff - "Leonard Cohen. Dublin Friday 13th July 2008"
It was as if Leonard Cohen had come to see us. His happiness radiated form every fibre of him. His appreciation of the audience, of his musicians, singers, the beautiful location and even the moon was just about matched by the 'band's' obvious love and respect for this man - a legend but also very much just a man...


Blog - Connemara Skies - "Leonard Cohen"
In old grounds surrounded by trees he played magnificently, memorably 'Towers of Song', 'Suzanne' & 'Hallelujah'...


Blog - Electric Roulette - "Leonard Cohen live review by a fan as opposed to some self-opinionated rock critic (warning - contains optimism)"
he was so lovely about making you aware of the rest of his band... who were amazing musicians... and applauding their skills. No big guitar solos from Leonard, but some amazingly deep singing. As if you'd expect anything less from him...


Blog - An Spailpín in Fánach - "The Secret Chord: Leonard Cohen Live in Dublin"
Leonard Cohen summed himself up in one pithy comment during his triumphant concert in the Royal Hospital, Kilmainham, on Friday night, when the 73 year old poet of romantic despair played for three hours before an enraptured crowd whom he held in the palm of his hand...


Dali shares his photo gallery of shots taken at the June 13 concert.


Lovely photos by Michael Stamp and Derek Fahy on The Leonard Cohen Files.


Blog - Bock the Robber (includes photos) - "Leonard Cohen In Dublin"
But when he says If you want a doctor, I'll examine every precious inch of you, 6000 women pass clean away and have to be revived with smelling salts. Lenny is 73, damn him! It's just not right...


Karl Smyth's shares his joyful photos from the June 14, 2008 concert.


Blog - DoChara's Ireland Blog (includes photos and more photos) - "Leonard Cohen at the Royal Hospital"
The man is extraordinary, his voice, his songs, his performance, his band, his singers - everything so utterly perfect that there are no superlatives that could do it justice. I am not exagerating when I say that this was probably the best night out I've had in my life...


Blog - Pensamiento Aleatorio - "Leonard Cohen Live - June 13th, 2008 - Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Dublin"
Leonard Cohen knows his business, the show builds up to the point where you are completely immersed in the music, the setlist, everything is done with a purpose...


Discuss the tour and read fan reviews on The Leonard Cohen Forum and in French on the Leonard Cohen Forum (French site).









Dublin, Ireland

Notes and other details

TDs choose Cohen concert over fallout

Herald.ie - June 16, 2008

Leonard Cohen's first appearance in Ireland in 20 years proved too good to miss for both the winners and the losers in the Lisbon Treaty vote.

As their government colleagues reeled from the rejection of the treaty, Bertie Ahern and Justice Minister Dermot Ahern forgot their troubles at the sold-out Kilmainham gigs.

It was a beaming and upbeat Gerry Adams who took his seat hours after the side he'd backed was declared the winner.

The Justice Minister and Sinn Fein leader were among the 10,000 who attended on the first of the three sold-out performances by the 73-year-old Canadian over the weekend.

Bono and his wife Ali, along with pal Guggi, were also at the gig which was already being branded legendary before the final encore.

U2 manager Paul McGuinness and his wife were in the crowd as were Gerry Ryan and his family.

It was last night before former Taoiseach Bertie Ahern made it to see Mr Cohen.

The man whose long goodbye is being cited as a factor in the government losing the referendum put aside his woes for a few hours at least.

It was a brief respite. Bertie is due back in the Mahon Tribunal for another grilling this week while his successor and team deal with the fallout from the people's verdict on Lisbon.








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